A letter to Martin Folkes, Esq; …

[Costard (George)]

A letter to Martin Folkes, Esq; …

Concerning the Rise and Progress of Astronomy among the Antients.

Description: FIRST EDITION, a few diagrams and illustrations in the text, and much Greek, Hebrew and Arabic type, a little browned in places, pp. [2], 158, [1, errata], [bound with:] [Costard (George)] A Further Account of the Rise and Progress of Astronomy amongst the Antients, in three letters to Martin Folkes. Oxford: Printed at the Theatre, for Richard Clements, 1748, FIRST EDITION, a few diagrams in the text, pp. 163, [1, bookseller's catalogue], [and:] Parker (George) Remarks upon the solar and the lunar years, the cycle of 19 years, commonly called the golden number, the epact, and a method of finding the time of Easter, as it is now observed in most parts of Europe. Being part of a letter from the Right Honourable George Earl of Macclesfield to Martin Folkes, Esq; President of the Royal Society, and by him communicated to the same May 10, 1750. Charles Davis, 1750, FIRST EDITION, folding table at end, pp. [2], 19, 8vo, the three bound together in contemporary polished calf, spine gilt in compartments with red lettering-piece, rebacked with original spine laid on, marbled endpapers, edges of the second work stained red, book label of Biblioteca San Isidoro de Urbe on front paste-down with their ink stamp at foot of title and last leaf and manuscript inscription on title, ink stamp of Biblioteca San Vilaseca on title recto, later ownership inscription of Richard Francis Walsh, 1827, on first title, good

Publication Details: Printed by Jacob Ilive for T. Osborne and J. Hildyard at York. 1746

Notes: Costard (1710-1782) was educated at Wadham College, Oxford, where he became fellow and tutor. One of the earliest writers on the history of astronomy, his Letter to Martin Folkes and Further Account treat the Astronomy of the Chaldeans, of the Constellations in the Book of Job, and of the Mythological Astronomy of the Ancients. In his view exact astronomy was a product of Greek genius, beginning with Thales, and owed little either to Egypt or Babylon. His works are still worth consulting for the frequent references to and citations from Hebrew, Arabic, and the less-known Greek authors containe...more

Bibliography: (ESTC T38154, T148086, T118141)

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Price: £950

Subject: Sciences

Published Date: 1746

Stock Number: 46858

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